Turing-machine meaning

A hypothetical computing device capable of storing information and responding to computational questions, used in mathematical studies of computability.
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An early hypothetical model for a simple computer capable theoretically of solving complex problems by performing a small number of basic operations.
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An abstract model of a computing device, used in mathematical studies of computability. A Turing machine takes a tape with a string of symbols on it as an input, and can respond to a given symbol by changing its internal state, writing a new symbol on the tape, shifting the tape right or left to the next symbol, or halting. The inner state of the Turing machine is described by a finite state machine . It has been shown that if the answer to a computational problem can be computed in a finite amount of time, then there exists an abstract Turing machine that can compute it.
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An abstract form of a computing device that is more like a software program than a piece of hardware. Any so-called Turing machine can be implemented on an infinite number of computing devices. A Turing machine would have a read/write head that scans a one-dimensional, bidirectional tape divided into equal-sized sections inscribed with a 1 or a 0. Computation starts when the mechanism in a given “state” scans a section, erasing what it discovers there, printing a 0 or a 1, moving to an adjacent section, and going into a new state. This behavior is determined by three key parameters: (1) the state the mechanism is in; (2) the value in the section the mechanism is scanning; and (3) a set of instructions. For decades, a number of computer scientists have proven that if conventional digital computers are considered in isolation from random external inputs (for example, a stream of bits produced by radioactive decay), then with enough time and tape, a Turing machine could calculate any function a digital computer could calculate. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Turing Machine. [Online, May 27, 2003.] Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Website. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/turing- machine/; Computing Corporation Website. http://www.securecomputing.com/index.cfm? skey=738.
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(computing theory) An abstract computing machine introduced in 1936 by Alan Turing to give a mathematically precise definition of computability.
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Origin of turing-machine

  • After Alan Mathison Turing who conceived such a machine

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Alan Turing English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer

    From Wiktionary