Tambour definition

tămbo͝or, tăm-bo͝or
Frequency:
A drum or drummer.
noun
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A rolling front or top for a desk or table, consisting of narrow strips of wood glued to canvas.
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A small embroidery frame, usually made of wood or plastic, consisting of two concentric hoops between which fabric is stretched.
noun
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Embroidery made on such a frame.
noun
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An embroidery frame of two closely fitting, concentric hoops that hold the cloth stretched between them.
noun
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Embroidery worked on such a frame.
noun
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To embroider on a tambour.
verb
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A circular frame for embroidery.
noun
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(architecture) The capital of a Corinthian column.
noun
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(military) A work usually in the form of a redan, to enclose a space before a door or staircase, or at the gorge of a larger work. It is arranged like a stockade.
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(biology) A shallow metallic cup or drum, with a thin elastic membrane supporting a writing lever. Two or more of these are connected by a rubber tube and used to transmit and register the movements of the pulse or of any pulsating artery.
noun
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To do (embroidery) on a frame consisting of two concentric hoops.
verb
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To embroider at or on such a frame.
verb
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A drum.
noun
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A door, panel, etc., as in a cabinet, consisting of narrow, wooden slats glued to a flexible base, as canvas, that slides in grooves, as around curves.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
tambour
Plural:
tambours

Origin of tambour

  • Middle English from Old French ultimately from Arabic ṭanbūr stringed musical instrument probably akin to Persian tambūr lute from Middle Persian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French tambour ("drum").

    From Wiktionary