Tambour meaning

tăm'bo͝or', tăm-bo͝or'
A small embroidery frame, usually made of wood or plastic, consisting of two concentric hoops between which fabric is stretched.
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A drum or drummer.
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A rolling front or top for a desk or table, consisting of narrow strips of wood glued to canvas.
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Embroidery made on such a frame.
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To do (embroidery) on a frame consisting of two concentric hoops.
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To embroider at or on such a frame.
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A drum.
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A door, panel, etc., as in a cabinet, consisting of narrow, wooden slats glued to a flexible base, as canvas, that slides in grooves, as around curves.
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An embroidery frame of two closely fitting, concentric hoops that hold the cloth stretched between them.
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Embroidery worked on such a frame.
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To embroider on a tambour.
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A circular frame for embroidery.
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(architecture) The capital of a Corinthian column.
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(military) A work usually in the form of a redan, to enclose a space before a door or staircase, or at the gorge of a larger work. It is arranged like a stockade.
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(biology) A shallow metallic cup or drum, with a thin elastic membrane supporting a writing lever. Two or more of these are connected by a rubber tube and used to transmit and register the movements of the pulse or of any pulsating artery.
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Origin of tambour

Middle English from Old French ultimately from Arabic ṭanbūr stringed musical instrument probably akin to Persian tambūr lute from Middle Persian