Supersede meaning

so͝opər-sēd
To take the place of (a person), as in an office or position; succeed.
verb
6
0
Supersede is defined as to replace.

An example of supersede is for a new person to take the place of the old class president.

verb
6
1
To cause to be set aside or dropped from use as inferior or obsolete and replaced by something else.
verb
5
0
To take the place of; replace or supplant.
verb
4
0
To take the place of in office, function, etc.; succeed.
verb
4
0
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To remove or cause to be removed so as to make way for another; supplant.
verb
3
0
Set (something) aside.
verb
2
0
Take the place of.

No one could supersede his sister.

verb
2
0
Displace in favour of another.

Modern US culture has superseded the native forms.

verb
2
0
(Internet) An updated newsgroup post that supersedes an earlier version.

Rogue cancels and supersedes are being issued on a large scale against posters.

noun
2
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Origin of supersede

  • Late Middle English (Scottish) superceden to postpone, defer from Old French superceder from Latin supersedēre to sit on top of, abstain from super- super- sedēre to sit sed- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French superseder (“postpone, defer"), from Latin supersedere, from super (“over") + sedere (“to sit"). The meaning “to replace" is from 1642, probably by association with unrelated precede - note that "˜c' instead of "˜s' (from cedere (“to go"), not sedere (“to sit")). As a result, supercede is a common misspelling - see therein for further discussion.

    From Wiktionary