Smith meaning

smĭth
A blacksmith.
noun
3
1
(person) 1894?-1937; U.S. blues singer.
proper name
1
0
An English surname (the most common in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand).
pronoun
1
0
A metalworker, especially one who works metal when it is hot and malleable. Often used in combination.

A silversmith; a goldsmith.

noun
1
1
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(person) 1723-90; Scot. economist.
proper name
0
0
(person) (called Al Smith) 1873-1944; U.S. politician.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1906-65; U.S. sculptor & painter.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1580?-1631; Eng. colonist in America.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1805-44; U.S. founder of the Mormon Church.
proper name
0
0
Advertisement
(person) 1771-1845; Eng. clergyman & essayist.
proper name
0
0
(person) 1769-1839; Eng. geologist.
proper name
0
0
A skilled maker, composer, or user of a (specified) thing.

Songsmith, wordsmith.

affix
0
0
A craftsperson who works metal into desired forms using a hammer and other tools, sometimes heating the metal to make it more workable, especially a blacksmith.
noun
0
0
(archaic) An artist.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To forge, to form, usually on an anvil; by heating and pounding.
verb
0
0
The definition of a smith is a person who works with metal, or a very common last name.

An example of a smith is a person who makes locks; a locksmith.

An example of a well-known person with this last name is John Smith.

noun
0
1
One who makes or works at something specified. Often used in combination.

A locksmith; a wordsmith.

noun
0
1
A person who makes or repairs metal objects, esp. by shaping the metal while it is hot and soft; metalworker.

Silversmith.

noun
0
1

Origin of smith

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English smith, from Old English smiþ (“handicraftsman, smith, blacksmith, armorer, carpenter, worker in metals or in wood"), from Proto-Germanic *smiþaz (“arranger, smith"), from Proto-Indo-European *smÄ“y-, *smÄ«- (“to cut, hew"). Cognate with Dutch smid, German Schmied, Swedish/Norwegian smed.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English smithen (“To work metal, forge, beat into, torment, refine (of God - to refine his chosen); create, to work as a blacksmith"), from Old English smiþian (“to forge, fabricate"). Compare Dutch smeden, German schmieden, from Proto-Germanic *smiþōnÄ….

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English, from Old English smiþ (“metals craftsman")

    From Wiktionary