Sacrament meaning

săkrə-mənt
Frequency:
(christianity) Any of certain rites instituted by Jesus and believed to be means of grace: baptism, confirmation, the Eucharist, penance, holy orders, matrimony, and Anointing of the Sick are the seven recognized by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches; Protestants generally recognize only baptism and the Lord's Supper (the Eucharist)
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The definition of a sacrament is a religious ceremony recognized by the Christian church, or a rite of passage that infers some blessing or grace on people who receive it.

Baptism is an example of a sacrament in the Protestant and Roman Catholic churches.

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(christianity) A rite believed to be a means of or visible form of grace, especially:
  • In the Eastern, Roman Catholic, and some other Western Christian churches, any of the traditional seven rites that were instituted by Jesus and recorded in the New Testament and that confer sanctifying grace.
  • In most other Western Christian churches, the two rites, Baptism and the Eucharist, that were instituted by Jesus to confer sanctifying grace.
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A religious rite similar to a Christian sacrament, as in character or meaning.
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Something regarded as having a sacred character or mysterious meaning.
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The Eucharist, or Holy Communion; also, the consecrated bread and wine, or sometimes the bread alone, used in the Eucharist.
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(Christianity) A sacred act or ceremony in Christianity. In Roman Catholic theology, a sacrament is defined as "an outward sign instituted by Christ to give grace."
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The pledge or token of an oath or solemn covenant; a sacred thing; a mystery.
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The oath of allegiance taken by soldiers in Ancient Rome; hence, a sacred ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath.
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(Islam) The rites in the five pillars of Islam.
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Origin of sacrament

  • Middle English from Old French sacrement from Late Latin sacrāmentum from Latin oath from sacrāre to consecrate from sacer sacr- sacred sacred

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ecclesiastical Latin sacrāmentum (“sacrament"), from Latin sacrō (“hallow, consecrate"), from sacer (“sacred, holy"), originally sum deposited by parties to a suit.

    From Wiktionary