Reboot meaning

rē-bo͝ot'
To do over or remake (something)
verb
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To turn (a computer's operating system) off and then on again; restart.
verb
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To bring back (an earlier film or television show), usually with a new cast and updated script.
verb
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The act or an instance of rebooting a computer's operating system.
noun
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A film or television show that is a remake of an earlier production, typically with a different or refreshed viewpoint.
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To boot again, as to restore the computer to operation after a program failure.
verb
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The act or an instance of rebooting.
noun
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To reload the operating system and start over. A reboot often solves many software problems in computers, smartphones, tablets, cable boxes and many other electronics devices, because it resets the system. People have even had to reboot a ceiling fan by unplugging and plugging it back into its AC source in order for the wireless remote to work again.Restart vs. Shut Down/StartIf a Restart option in an electronic device is selected from the menu, the current applications are closed, and the operating system is reloaded. This is a "warm boot," which does not clear internal RAM memory. When Shut Down is chosen, and the unit is turned back on, this "cold boot" clears memory and reloads the OS, which is often more effective for solving problems than restarting. See cold boot, clean boot and boot.
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(computing) An instance of rebooting.
noun
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(narratology) The restarting of a series storyline that discards all previous continuity.
noun
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(computing) To cause a computer to execute its boot process, effectively resetting the computer and causing the operating system to reload, especially after a system or power failure.
verb
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(narratology) To discard all previous continuity in a series and restart the series.
verb
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(video games) To restart a (computer or video game) from the beginning.
verb
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Origin of reboot

  • re- +"Ž boot
    From Wiktionary