Radio meaning

rādē-ō
Electromagnetic radiation with lower frequencies and longer wavelengths than those of microwaves, having frequencies lower than 300 megahertz and wavelengths longer than 1 meter.
noun
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Relating to or involving the emission of radio waves.
adjective
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To send (a message, etc.) or communicate with (a person) by radio.
verb
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To transmit by radio.

Radio a message to headquarters.

verb
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To transmit a message to by radio.

Radioed the spacecraft.

verb
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Having to do with electromagnetic wave frequencies between c. 10 kilohertz and c. 300,000 megahertz.
adjective
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Radio is communication over distance when sounds are converted to electromagnetic waves and sent to a receiver that transfers the waves back to sounds.

An example of radio is how people listen to music in their cars on their way to work.

noun
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Radio means to communicate over a device that uses electromagnetic waves.

An example of radio is to broadcast an important community announcement over the local music station.

verb
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The definition of radio is relating to a device that uses electromagnetic waves for communication.

An example of radio used as an adjective is in the phrase "radio station," which means a particular station that broadcasts news and or music.

adjective
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To transmit messages or a message by radio.

A ship radioing for help.

verb
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Radiation; radiant energy.

Radiometer.

prefix
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Radioactive.

Radiochemistry.

prefix
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Radio.

Radiotelephone.

prefix
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The practice or science of communicating over a distance by converting sounds or signals into electromagnetic waves and transmitting these directly through space, without connecting wires, to a receiving set, which changes them back into sounds, signals, etc.
noun
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Such a receiving set, esp. one adapted for receiving the waves of the assigned frequencies of certain transmitters or broadcasting stations.
noun
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Of, using, used in, sent by, or operated by radio.
adjective
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Ray, raylike.
affix
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By radio.

Radiotelegraph.

affix
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By means of radiant energy.

Radiothermy.

affix
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Radioactive.

Radiotherapy.

affix
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The equipment used to generate, alter, transmit, and receive radio waves so that they carry information.
noun
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(1) The transmission of wireless signals (electromagnetic waves) over the air or through a hollow tube called a "waveguide." Although "radio" is often thought of as only AM and FM or sometimes two-way radio, all transmission systems that propagate signals through the air are some form of "radio," including TV, satellite, portable phones, cellphones and wireless LANs. See spectrum.
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Electromagnetic energy with a waveform having a frequency above the upper limit of the audio range of 3 kHz and equal or less than the lower limit of the infrared light range of 300 GHz.At the low end of the range is extremely low frequency (ELF) radio, which operates at 30
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(uncountable) The technology that allows for the transmission of sound or other signals by modulation of electromagnetic waves.
noun
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(countable) A device that can capture (receive) the signal sent over radio waves and render the modulated signal as sound.
noun
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(countable) A device that can transmit radio signals.
noun
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(Internet, uncountable) The continuous broadcasting of sound recordings via the Internet in the style of traditional radio.
noun
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(intransitive, , intransitive) To use two-way radio to transmit (a message) (to another radio or other radio operat).

I think the boat is sinking; we'd better radio for help. / I radioed him already. / Radio the coordinates this time. / OK. I radioed them the coordinates.

verb
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To order or assist (to a location), using telecommunications.
verb
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Origin of radio

  • Fr < L radius, ray: see radius

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Short for radiotelegraphy

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From radiation

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin radius (“ray").

    From Wiktionary