Quid-pro-quo meaning

kwĭd' prō kwō'
Quid pro quo is defined as giving something in exchange for getting something.

An example of quid pro quo is when you cover for your friend in a lie in exchange for him covering for you later.

An example of quid pro quo is a boss who offers his secretary a raise if she will kiss him.

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Something that is given in return for something else or accepted as a reciprocal part of an exchange.
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One thing in return for another.
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Something equivalent; substitute.
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Something exchanged for another thing of approximately equal value, not necessarily in a monetary sense.
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Something understood as another; an equivocation.
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(law) This for that; giving something to receive something else; something equivalent; something in return.
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We had no money so we had to live by quid pro quo.

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A Latin term that means “something for something.” The term has found much usage in the securities industry and among lawyers. Its use has grown in the stock market context after the stock market bubble burst in 2000. Regulators began investigating conflicts of interest between a bank’s allocation of hot initial public offerings and its selection to lead other lucrative investment banking business. In return for receiving issues in highly sought after IPOs, many companies and corporate executives were expected to give banks other investment banking business or direct trades through the bank, often at inflated commission rates.
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Origin of quid-pro-quo

  • Latin quid prō quō quid something prō for quō ablative of quid something
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin: "what for what". See quid, pro, and quo
    From Wiktionary