Quark meaning

kwôrk, kwärk
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Any of a class of six fundamental fermions, two in each of the three generations, one having an electric charge of −13 , the other, +23 , comprising the down, up, strange, charm, bottom, and top quarks. Quarks are the basic components of all hadrons.
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Any of the six quarks' associated antiparticles, the antiquarks.
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A soft, creamy, usually unsalted cheese traditional to central Europe and made from cow's milk that is coagulated by the lactic acid produced by bacteria rather than by the use of rennet.
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(particle physics) Any of a set of elementary particles that bind together in various combinations to form hadrons.
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Any of a group of elementary particles supposed to be the fundamental units that combine to make up the subatomic particles known as hadrons (baryons, such as neutrons and protons, and mesons). There are six different flavors (or types) of quark: up quark, down quark, top quark, bottom quark, charm quark, and strange quark. Quarks have fractional electric charges, such as1 /3 the charge of an electron.
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(physics) In the Standard Model, an elementary subatomic particle which forms matter. Quarks are never found alone in nature and combine to form hadrons, such as protons and neutrons.
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(computing, X Window System) An integer that uniquely identifies a text string.
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A soft creamy cheese, eaten throughout northern, central, and eastern Europe, very similar to cottage cheese except that it is usually not made with rennet.
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Origin of quark

  • German from Middle High German quarc from Lower Sorbian twarog from Old Church Slavonic tvarogŭ teuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Three quarks for Muster Mark! , a line in Finnegans Wake by James Joyce

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First used in 1963 by the discoverer of quarks, Murray Gell-Mann, to name these new particles. The literary connection to James Joyce's Finnegans Wake was asserted later (quote below).

    From Wiktionary

  • German Quark, from late Middle High German twarc, from a West Slavic language, compare Polish twaróg.

    From Wiktionary