Meson definition

mĕzŏn, mĕs-, mēzŏn, -sŏn, mā-
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Any of a family of subatomic particles that are composed of a quark and an antiquark. Their masses are generally intermediate between leptons and baryons, and they can have positive, negative, or neutral charge. Mesons form a subclass of hadrons and include the kaon, pion and J/psi particles. Mesons were originally believed to be the particles that mediated the strong nuclear force, but it has since been shown that the gluon mediates this force.
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(particle physics) Any of a group of subatomic particles that are both hadrons and bosons, including the pion and kaon.
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(rare except entomology) The mesial plane dividing the body into similar right and left halves.
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(now specifically, physics) An elementary particle that is composed of a quark and an antiquark, such as a kaon or pion. (Meson composed of rarer quarks are much heavier.)
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Any of a class of subatomic particles that are both hadrons and bosons, are composed of a quark and an antiquark, participate in strong interactions, and have masses generally intermediate between those of leptons and baryons.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
meson
Plural:
mesons

Origin of meson

  • meso– –on

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek μέσον (méson, “middle").

    From Wiktionary

  • From meso- +"Ž on.

    From Wiktionary