Prodigal meaning

prŏdĭ-gəl
Exceedingly or recklessly wasteful.
adjective
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One who is given to wasteful luxury or extravagance.
noun
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Extremely abundant; profuse.
adjective
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Prodigal is a person who left home, often under bad terms, and who then has a long-awaited and much celebrated return home.

An example of prodigal is a son who comes home to make peace with his father after a ten year fight.

noun
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(often followed by of or with) Someone yielding profusely, lavish.

She was a merry person, glad and prodigal of smiles.

How can he be so prodigal with money on such a tight budget?

adjective
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Rashly or wastefully extravagant.

Prodigal expenditures on unneeded weaponry; a prodigal nephew who squandered his inheritance.

adjective
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Extremely generous; lavish.

Prodigal with one's praise.

adjective
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A person who wastes his means; spendthrift.
noun
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A prodigal person, a spendthrift.
noun
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Profuse, lavishly abundant.
adjective
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Returning after abandoning a person, group, or ideal, especially for selfish reasons; being a prodigal son.
adjective
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The definition of prodigal is spending money carelessly and foolishly.

An example of prodigal is buying very expensive cars and homes.

adjective
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Giving or given in abundance; lavish or profuse.
adjective
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A person who returns after a willful absence.
noun
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Wastefully extravagant.

He found himself guilty of prodigal spending during the holidays.

He is not a prodigal son.

adjective
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Origin of prodigal

  • Late Middle English probably back-formation from Middle English prodigalite from Old French from Late Latin prōdigālitās from Latin prōdigus prodigal from prōdigere to drive away, squander prōd-, prō- for, forth proud agere to drive ag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin prodigalis (“wasteful"), from Latin prodigus (“wasteful, lavish, prodigal"), from prodigere (“to consume, squander, drive forth"), from pro (“before, forward") + agere (“to drive").

    From Wiktionary