Proboscis meaning

prō-bŏsĭs, -kĭs
A long flexible snout or trunk, as of an elephant.
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A slender, tubular organ in the head region of an invertebrate, such as certain insects and worms, usually used for sucking or piercing.
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A human nose, especially a prominent one.
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Any tubular organ for sucking, food-gathering, sensing, etc., as of some insects, worms, and mollusks.
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A person's nose, esp. if large.
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A long flexible snout or trunk, as of an elephant.
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A slender, tubular organ in the head region of an invertebrate, such as certain insects and worms, usually used for sucking or piercing.
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A human nose, especially a prominent one.
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A long, flexible snout or trunk, as of an elephant.
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The slender, tubular feeding and sucking organ of certain invertebrates, such as butterflies and mosquitoes.
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(anatomy) An elongated tube from the head or connected to the mouth, of an animal.
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(informal, mildly humorous) A large or lengthy human nose.
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Origin of proboscis

  • Latin from Greek proboskis pro- in front pro–2 boskein to feed

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin proboscis, from Greek προβοσκίς "elephant's trunk," literally "means for taking food," from προ "forward" + βόσκειν "to nourish, feed," from βόσκεσςθαι "graze, be fed," from the root *bot (cf. βοτάνη "grass, fodder); more at botany.

    From Wiktionary