Phosgene definition

fŏsjēn, fŏz-
A colorless gas, COCl2 , having an odor similar to mown or moldy hay, used as a poison gas and in making resins, plastics, and dyes.
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A colorless, volatile, highly poisonous liquid, COCl2, prepared by the reaction of carbon monoxide with chlorine in the presence of activated charcoal or, orig., in sunlight; carbonyl chloride: used as a poison gas, in organic synthesis, in making dyes, etc.
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A colorless, volatile gas that has the odor of freshly mowed hay. When it reacts with water (as in the lungs during respiration), phosgene produces hydrochloric acid and carbon monoxide. It is used in making glass, dyes, resins, and plastics, and was used as a poisonous gas during World War I. Also called carbonyl chloride. Chemical formula: COCl2.
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(inorganic chemistry) Alternative form of carbonyl chloride.
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Origin of phosgene

  • French phosgène Greek phōs light phos– French -gène -gen

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From phos- + -gen.

    From Wiktionary