Parkinson-s-disease meaning

pär'kĭn-sənz
A progressive nervous disease occurring most often after the age of 50, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine and characterized by muscular tremor, slowing of movement, partial facial paralysis, peculiarity of gait and posture, and weakness.
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A degenerative disease of later life, characterized by a rhythmic tremor and muscular rigidity, caused by degeneration in the basal ganglia of the brain.
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A progressive disease of the central nervous system, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine and characterized by muscle tremors, muscle rigidity or stiffness, abnormally slow movement, and impaired balance and coordination. It usually affects people over the age of 50.
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A progressive neurologic disease occurring most often after the age of 50, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine. Individuals with Parkinson's disease exhibit tremors while at rest, slowing of movement, stiffening of gait and posture, and weakness. The disease is named after its discoverer, British physician and paleontologist James Parkinson (1755–1824).
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(neurology, pathology) A chronic neurological disorder resulting in lack of control over movement; poor balance and coordination; and similar symptoms.
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Origin of parkinson-s-disease

  • After James Parkinson (1755–1824), British physician
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Named after English physician James Parkinson (1755-1824).
    From Wiktionary