Oscilloscope meaning

ə-sĭl'ə-skōp'
An electronic instrument that produces an instantaneous trace on the screen of a cathode-ray tube corresponding to oscillations of voltage and current.
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A type of oscillograph that visually displays an electrical wave on a fluorescent screen, as of a cathode-ray tube.
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An electronic instrument used to observe and measure changing electrical signals. The amplitude of the signal as it varies with time is displayed graphically on a screen as a line stretching from left to right, with displacements up and down indicating the amplitude of the signal. Oscilloscopes are used to diagnose problems in electronic signal-processing devises, such as computers or stereos, and to monitor electrical activity in the body, such as that of heartbeats.
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A test instrument that is used to measure and analyze electronic signals (waves and pulses) displayed on its screen. The x-axis represents time, and the y-axis represents an instantaneous view of the voltage of the input signal. To allow viewing signals across a wide frequency range, the rate and speed at which the sweep of the x-axis occurs is configurable. The sensitivity of the inputs can also be configured to accept signals from microvolts peak-to-peak to many thousands of volts peak-to-peak.Both analog and digital oscilloscopes are available. In an analog scope, the x-axis is controlled by an internal time base, and the y-axis is directly controlled by the input signal. In a digital model, the input voltage is sampled at a preset frequency. The x-axis represents the samples along a timeline, and the y-axis shows the voltage levels of each sample. See spectrum analyzer.
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An electronic measuring instrument that creates a visible two-dimensional graph, on a screen, of one or more continuously varying voltages or currents.
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Origin of oscilloscope

oscill(ation) –scope