Modem definition

mōdəm
Frequency:
A device for transmitting and receiving digital data over telephone wires. Modems send data by converting it into audio signals and receive it by converting audio signals back into digital form. The speed at which modems transmit data is measured in bps (bits per second).
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The definition of a modem is a tool that sends and receives a signal to create a network and Internet connections.

An example of a modem is a tool that lets a computer connect to the Internet.

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A device that encodes digital computer signals into analog/analogue telephone signals and vice versa and allows computers to communicate over a phone line.
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A device that transmits and receives data using a modulated carrier wave. Modems are used to establish network and Internet connections.
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A device that converts data to a form that can be transmitted, as over communications lines, to equipment where a similar device reconverts it.
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Modem is defined as an abbreviation for modulator-demodulator, a device that makes it possible for computers to communicate with one another without being directly connected to each other.

An example of a modem is the device used for a computer to communicate with a satellite.

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A device that comprises both a modulator that changes a signal in some way in the forward direction and a demodulator that changes the signal back to its original form in the backward direction, essentially reversing the modulation process. Modems operate in balanced and symmetrical pairs, with one at each end of the communications circuit and with both having the same capabilities, at least at a minimum level.There are many types of devices characterized as modems, including cable modems, conventional modems, ADSL modems, ISDN modems (terminal adapters, or TAs), line drivers, and short haul modems. See also ADSL, cable modem, line driver, short haul modem, and TA.
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A conventional modem is a signal conversion device that interfaces a digital device to an analog circuit or channel. On the transmit side of the connection, a modem accepts an incoming digital signal and modulates (i.e., changes or varies) the characteristics of an electromagnetic waveform in some way to represent that signal over an analog carrier. The modulation technique generally involves amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), phase modulation (PM), or some combination. On the receive side of the connection, a modem with matching capabilities accepts the modulated signal over the analog carrier and demodulates the signal to extract the information and recreate the original digital signal. Many modems are capable of operating in full duplex, simultaneously modulating signals as they transmit them and demodulating signals as they receive them. See also AM, FM, and PM.
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Acronym for Modulator Demodulator, which changes information from analog form (such as that used on telephone lines) to digital form (such as that used on computers) for computer-to-computer communications. Though modems can transmit information at maximum rates of 56,000 bits per second (bps) or 56 kbps, limitations in the telephone system realistically produce modem speeds at 33.6 kbps or lower in practice. Today, modems for cable and DSL service are called digital modems, whereas those used for dial-up service are called analog modems. This terminology is somewhat misleading because all modems actually involve analog signaling. “Digital” relates to enhanced digital processing in the service provider’s systems and not within the modem per se. Cable modems and DSL modems utilize broadband signaling methods to obtain dramatically higher network speeds than traditional modems were able to obtain. About, Inc. Modem. [Online, 2004.] About, Inc. Website. http:// compnetworking.about.com/library/glossary/bldef-modem.htm.
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To transmit by modem.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
modem
Plural:
modems

Origin of modem

  • mo(dulator) dem(odulator)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Wiktionary