Magna-carta definitions

măg'nə kär'tə
The charter that King John of England issued in 1215 at the behest of his barons, recognizing the right of persons to certain basic liberties, such as due process, later also embodied in the American Constitution.
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The Magna Carta is defined as a legal document signed by King John of England on June 15, 1215 which stopped taxation without legislative approval and guaranteed a trial or legal process before taking a person's liberty or property.

An example of the Magna Carta was a document that gave the Englishman the right to have a trial before his property was taken due to unpaid back taxes.

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The great charter that King John of England was forced by the English barons to grant at Runnymede (June 15, 1215), traditionally interpreted as guaranteeing certain civil and political liberties.
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A charter, granted by King John to the barons at Runnymede in 1215, that is a basis of English constitutional tradition.
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Origin of magna-carta

Middle English from Medieval Latin Latin magna great charta charter