Luddite meaning

lŭdīt
One who opposes technical or technological change.
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Any of a group of early 19th century English textile workers who destroyed machinery because it would harm their livelihood.
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Any of a group of British workers who between 1811 and 1816 rioted and destroyed laborsaving textile machinery in the belief that such machinery would diminish employment.
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Any of a group of workers in England (1811-16) who smashed new labor-saving textile machinery in protest against unemployment and reduced wages.
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A person opposed in principle to technological change.
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Of or relating to Luddites.
adjective
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An individual who is against technological change. Luddite comes from Englishman Ned Lud, who rose up against his employer in the late 1700s. Subsequently, "Luddites" emerged in other companies to protest and even destroy new machinery that would put them out of a job. A neo-Luddite is a Luddite in the Internet age.Luddite vs. TechnophobeA Luddite is anti-technology because of personal principles, whereas a technophobe is afraid of computers and high-tech gadgets.
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An opponent of technology. The term comes from Ned Ludd, a leader of workmen in England who conducted campaigns early in the 19th century against replacing workers with machines.
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A pejorative term for someone who opposes technological or industrial innovation, especially if it automates manual functions or processes.The term originates in an unconfirmed folk legend about a feebleminded English (Nottinghamshire or Leicestershire) textile worker named Ted Ludd who smashed (c. 1779) two stocking knitting frames with a hammer to protest beatings by his master. The Luddites (1811
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(by extension, pejorative) Someone who opposes technological change.
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Origin of luddite

  • After Ned Ludd , an English laborer who was supposed to have destroyed weaving machinery around 1779

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • After Ned Ludd, a legendary example. See -ite.

    From Wiktionary