Lobster meaning

lŏbstər
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Any of several similar crustaceans, such as a spiny lobster.
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Any of several edible marine decapod crustaceans of the family Nephropidae, especially of the genus Homarus, having stalked eyes, long antennae, a pair of large pincers, and a cylindrical body.
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The flesh of a lobster used as food.
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To catch or try to catch lobsters.
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Any of various families (esp. Nephropidae) of marine, bottom-dwelling decapods with compound eyes, long antennae, and usually the first pair of legs modified into large, powerful pincers: lobsters are greenish or dark gray in color when alive, but turn bright red when boiled.
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The flesh of these animals used as food.
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To fish for lobsters.
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Red-colored, especially from a sunburn.
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A crustacean of the Nephropidae family, dark green or blue-black in colour turning bright red when cooked, with a hard shell and claws, which is used as a seafood.
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A crustacean of the Palinuridae family, pinkish red in colour, with a hard, spiny shell but no claws, which is used as a seafood.
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(historical) A soldier or officer of the imperial British Army (due to their red or scarlet uniform).
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(slang) An Australian twenty dollar note, due to its reddish-orange colour.
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To fish for lobsters.
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Origin of lobster

  • Middle English lopster, lobstere from Old English loppestre alteration (perhaps influenced by loppe, lobbe spider) of Latin locusta locust (grasshopper), lobster

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lopster (“lobster"), from Old English loppestre (“lobster, spider-like creature"), believed to be a corruption of Latin locusta (“lobster, locust") + the Old English feminine agent suffix -estre; or from Old English lobbe, loppe (“spider") + the Old English feminine agent suffix -estre, equivalent to lop +"Ž -ster. More at lop.

    From Wiktionary