Indigo definition

ĭndĭ-gō
A deep violet-blue color, designated by Newton as one of the seven prismatic or primary colors.
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Indigo is defined as a deep bluish purple color or dye.

An example of indigo is a dark bluish purple iris flower.

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Any of several related plants, especially those of the genera Amorpha and Baptisia.
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The hue of that portion of the visible spectrum lying between blue and violet, evoked in the human observer by radiant energy with wavelengths of approximately 420 to 450 nanometers; a dark blue to grayish purple blue.
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Any of various shrubs or herbs of the genus Indigofera in the pea family, having pinnately compound leaves and usually red or purple flowers in axillary racemes.
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Any of a genus (Indigofera) of plants of the pea family that yield indigo.
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Of this color.
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A blue dye, C16H10N2O2, obtained from certain plants, esp. a plant (Indigofera tinctoria) native to India, or made synthetically, usually from aniline.
noun
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The definition of indigo is something bluish purple in color.

An example of indigo is a deep purple dress with a hint of blue.

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A purplish-blue colour.

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An indigo-colored dye obtained from certain plants (the indigo plant or woad), or a similar synthetic dye.
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An indigo plant, such as from species in genera Indigofera, Amorpha (false indigo), Baptisia (wild indigo), and Psorothamnus and Dalea (indigobush).
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Having a deep blue colour.
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A dark blue crystalline compound, C16 H10 N2 O2 , that is obtained from these plants or produced synthetically and is widely used as a textile dye.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
indigo
Plural:
indigoes, indigos

Origin of indigo

  • Spanish índigo Dutch indigo (from Portuguese endego) both from Latin indicum from Greek Indikon (pharmakon) Indian (dye) neuter of Indikos of India from India India from Indos the Indus River from Old Persian Hinduš Sind Hindi

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Spanish indico, Portuguese endego, or Dutch (via Portuguese) indigo, all from Latin indicum (“indigo”), from Ancient Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon, “Indian dye”), from Ἰνδία (India).

    From Wiktionary