Indiction meaning

ĭn-dĭkshən
A 15-year cycle used as a chronological unit in ancient Rome and incorporated in some medieval systems.
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The edict of a Roman emperor, fixing the tax valuation of property for each fifteen-year period.
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The tax levied or this valuation.
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(historical) A fiscal period of fifteen years, instituted by Constantine in 313 CE (but counting from 1st September 312), used throughout the Middle Ages as a way of dating events, documents etc.
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A declaration or official announcement.
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(historical) The decree made by Roman Emperors which fixed the property tax for the next fifteen years.
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Origin of indiction

  • Middle English indiccioun from Late Latin indictiō indictiōn- proclamation, period of 15 years from Latin indictus past participle of indīcere to proclaim in- intensive pref. in–2 dīcere to say deik- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French indiction or its source, Latin indictiōnem, accusative singular of indictiō, from indicere, present active infinitive of indicō.

    From Wiktionary