Hyacinth definition

hīə-sĭnth
Frequency:
(greek mythology) A plant, perhaps the larkspur, gladiolus, or iris, that sprang from the blood of the slain Hyacinthus.
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A deep purplish blue to vivid violet.
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A bulbous Mediterranean plant (Hyacinthus orientalis) having narrow leaves and a terminal raceme of variously colored, usually fragrant flowers, with a funnel-shaped perianth.
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Any of several similar or related plants, such as the grape hyacinth.
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A reddish or cinnamon-colored variety of transparent zircon, used as a gemstone.
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A blue precious stone, perhaps the sapphire, known in antiquity.
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A bluish purple.
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Among the ancients, a blue gem, probably the sapphire.
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Any of the reddish-orange or brownish varieties of zircon or certain other minerals, used as a semiprecious stone.
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Any of a genus (Hyacinthus) of plants of the lily family, with narrow channeled leaves and spikes of fragrant, bell-shaped flowers in white, yellow, red, blue, or purple.
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The bulb of any of these plants.
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The flower.
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Any bulbous plant of the genus Hyacinthus, native to the Mediterranean and South Africa.
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A variety of zircon, ranging in color from brown, orange, reddish-brown and yellow; a jacinth.
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Alternative form of Hyacinthus.
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(rare) A male given name.
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A female given name. One of the less common flower names used since the 19th century.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
hyacinth
Plural:
hyacinths

Origin of hyacinth

  • Latin hyacinthus from Greek huakinthos wild hyacinth

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English jacinth, from Old French jacincte, from Medieval Latin jacintus, from Latin hyacinthus, from Ancient Greek ὑάκινθος (huakinthos, “any of several dark blue flowers”), ultimately from a non-Indo-European Mediterranean language. Relatinized 16c.

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin Hyacinthus, a saint's name from the name of an Ancient Greek Ὑάκινθος (Huakinthos), a mythological character .

    From Wiktionary