Honky-tonk meaning

hông'kē-tôngk', hŏng'kē-tŏngk'
Designating or of a style of piano music having a bouncy rhythm and a tinkling sound.
adjective
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(dated) A cheap nightclub.

Gimme, gimme, gimme a honky-tonk girl. The Rolling Stones, "Honky-tonk Woman".

noun
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Of or relating to such a bar or dance hall; tawdry.

A honky-tonk district; honky-tonk entertainers.

adjective
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Of, relating to, or being a type of ragtime characteristically played on a tinny-sounding piano or in a honky-tonk.
adjective
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To visit cheap, noisy bars or dance halls.
verb
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A bar, esp. one where country music is played.
noun
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A cheap, noisy bar or dance hall.
noun
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A cheap, disreputable, noisy cabaret or nightclub.
noun
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Of or like a honky-tonk; specif., cheap, loud, low-class, etc.
adjective
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To make the rounds of honky-tonks.
verb
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Alternative spelling of honky-tonk.
noun
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(dated) The type of music typically played in such a club.
noun
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A style of country music emphasizing traditional country instruments (e.g., guitar, steel guitar and fiddle); a rough, nasal vocal style; and tragic themes such as heartbreak, infidelity and alcoholism.
noun
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Origin of honky-tonk

  • Perhaps from honk
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From honk-a-tonk (“a cheap nightclub”), possibly imitative
    From Wiktionary