Herry meaning

(obsolete) To honour, praise or celebrate.
verb
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Circa 1830, Andrew Picken, The Deer-Stalkers of Glenskiach, 1840, page 38,

The victories of Inverlochy, of Alderne, and of Alford, the herrying of Argyleshire, and the sacking of Dundee, could scarcely make up for the terrible toils encountered in climhing the bleak precipices of the west, in wading through drifts of snow among the mountains during the depths of winter, […] .

verb
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1822, James Hogg, The Three Perils of Man; Or, War, Women, and Witchcraft, page 228,

The heroic Sim flew to horse, and desired all that were friends to the Scots to follow, while Laidlaw addressed his compeers, saying, "Up, lads, and let us ride; our host must not be herried while we are under his roof."

verb
1
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Origin of herry

  • From Middle English heryen, herien, from Old English herian (“to extol, praise, commend, help”), from Proto-Germanic *hazjaną (“to call, praise”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱens- (“to speak in a florid, solemn style, attest, witness”). Cognate with Middle High German haren (“to call, shout”), Gothic (hazjan, “to praise”), Latin cēnseō (“inspect, appraise, estimate”, verb), Latin cēnsus (“estimation”). See censor, census.
    From Wiktionary
  • From earlier hery, from Middle English herien, herȝen, from Old English hergian (“to ravage, plunder, lay waste, harry; seize, take, capture”), from Proto-Germanic *harjōną (“to devastate, lay wate”). More at harry.
    From Wiktionary