Hall-effect meaning

Generation of an electric potential perpendicular to both an electric current flowing along a conducting material and an external magnetic field applied at right angles to the current upon application of the magnetic field.
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A phenomenon that occurs when an electric current moving through a conductor is exposed to an external magnetic field applied at a right angle, in which an electric potential develops in the conductor at a right angle to both the direction of current and the magnetic field. The Hall effect is a direct result of Lorentz forces acting on the charges in the current, and is named after physicist Edwin Herbert Hall (1855–1938).
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(physics) The effect in which a conductor that carries an electric current perpendicular to an applied magnetic field develops a voltage gradient transverse to both current and field.
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Origin of hall-effect

  • After Edwin Herbert Hall (1855–1938), American physicist
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Edwin Herbert Hall, American physicist.
    From Wiktionary