Gilded-age meaning

gĭldĭd
The period in American history from about 1870 to 1900, during which rapid industrialization, a labor pool swelled by immigration, and minimal governmental regulation allowed the upper classes to accumulate great wealth and enjoy opulent lifestyles.
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(proper) A period of U.S. history in the 1870s noted for political corruption, financial speculation, and the opulent lives of wealthy industrialists and financiers.
noun
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The Gilded Age is defined as the time between the Civil War and World War I during which the U.S. population and economy grew quickly, there was a lot of political corruption and corporate financial misdealings and many wealthy people lived very fancy lives.

An example of the Gilded Age is when corporations becoming the most common form of business and labor unions started to grow strong.

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Origin of gilded-age

  • After the 1873 novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner (1829–1900), American author

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition