Fugue definition

fyo͝og
Frequency:
(psychiatry) A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.
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(psychiatry) A state of psychological amnesia during which the subject seems to behave in a conscious and rational way, but, upon return to normal consciousness, cannot remember the period of time nor what he or she did during it.
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(music) A contrapuntal musical composition whose basic structure consists of a theme or themes stated successively in different voices.
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A musical composition for a definite number of parts or voices, in which a subject is announced in one voice, imitated in succession by each of the other voices, and developed contrapuntally.
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The definition of a fugue is a musical composition for a specific number of parts or voices, or is a temporary state of amnesia.

An example of a fugue is a song written specifically for three voices.

An example of a fugue is forgetting the last ten minutes.

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(psychiatry) A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.
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(music) A contrapuntal piece of music wherein a particular melody is played in a number of voices, each voice introduced in turn by playing the melody.
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Anything in literature, poetry, film, painting, etc., that resembles a fugue in structure or in its elaborate complexity and formality.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fugue
Plural:
fugues

Origin of fugue

  • Italian fuga (influenced by French fugue) (from Italian fuga) from Latin flight

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French, from Italian fuga (“flight, ardor”), from Latin fuga (“act of fleeing”), from fugere (“to flee”). Apparently from the metaphor that the first part starts alone on its course, and is pursued by later parts.

    From Wiktionary