Fermion meaning

fûrmē-ŏn, fĕr-
Frequency:
An elementary or composite particle, such as an electron, quark, or proton, whose spin is an integer multiple of1 /2 . Fermions act on each other by exchanging bosons and are subject to the Pauli exclusion principle, which requires that no two fermions be in the same quantum state. Fermions are named after the physicist Enrico Fermi, who along with Paul Dirac developed quantum statistical models of their behavior.
1
0
Any of a class of particles having a spin that is half an odd integer and obeying the exclusion principle, by which no more than one identical particle may occupy the same quantum state. The fermions include the baryons, quarks, and leptons.
noun
0
0
Any of a class of subatomic particles that obey the Pauli exclusion principle and have fractional spin, including the leptons, quarks, and baryons.
noun
0
0
0
0
A particle with totally antisymmetric composite quantum states, which means it must obey the Pauli exclusion principle and hence Fermi–Dirac statistics. They have half-integer spin. Among them are many elementary particles, most derived from quarks. Compare boson.
noun
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of fermion

  • After Enrico Fermi

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Enrico Fermi (Italian-American physicist) + -on.

    From Wiktionary