Diurnal meaning

dī-ûrnəl
(botany) Opening during daylight hours and closing at night.
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Relating to or occurring in a 24-hour period; daily.
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Occurring or active during the daytime rather than at night.

Diurnal animals.

adjective
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Occurring or active during the daytime rather than at night.

Diurnal animals.

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The definition of diurnal is something that happens daily or in the daytime.

An example of something diurnal is a diurnal flower that blooms in the sunlight, but closes at night.

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A book containing all the offices for the daily canonical hours of prayer except matins.
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Of, done, or happening in the daytime.
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(archaic) A daily newspaper.
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(eccles.) A service book containing prayers for the daytime canonical hours and for compline.
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Relating to or occurring in a 24-hour period; daily.
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(botany) Opening during daylight hours and closing at night.
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Most active during the daytime. Many animals, including the apes, are diurnal.
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Having leaves or flowers that open in daylight and close at night. The morning glory and crocus are diurnal.
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Happening or occurring during daylight, or primarily active during that time.

Most birds are diurnal.

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(botany) Said of a flower open, or releasing its perfume during daylight hours, but not at night.
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Having a daily cycle that is completed every 24 hours, usually referring to tasks, processes, tides, or sunrise to sunset.
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(uncommon) Done once every day; daily, quotidian.
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(archaic) Published daily.
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A flower that opens only in the day.
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(Catholicism) A book containing canonical offices performed during the day, hence not matins.
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(archaic) A diary or journal.
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(archaic) A daily news publication.
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Occurring each day; daily.
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Origin of diurnal

  • Middle English from Late Latin diurnālis from Latin diurnus from diēs day dyeu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin diurnālis, from diēs (“day”). Cognate with journal.

    From Wiktionary