Distrain meaning

dĭ-strān
Frequency:
To seize and hold (property) to compel payment or reparation, as of debts.
verb
0
0
To seize the property of (a person) in order to compel payment of debts; distress.
verb
0
0
To levy a distress.
verb
0
0
To seize and hold (property) as security or indemnity for a debt.
verb
0
0
To seize personal property of an individual, typically a tenant, to compel the performance of an obligation, such as the payment of rent. See also distress.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XII, xii.

Thus spake the Prince, and gently 'gan distrainNow him, now her, between his friendly arms.

verb
0
0
(law, intransitive) To seize somebody's property in place of, or to force, payment of a debt.

To distrain a person by his goods and chattels.

verb
0
0

Origin of distrain

  • Middle English distreinen from Old French destreindre destreign- from Medieval Latin distringere distrinct- from Latin to hinder dis- apart dis– stringere to draw tight streig- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French destraindre, from Latin distringere (“to pull asunder, stretch out, engage, hinder, molest, Medieval Latin also compel, coerce as by exacting a pledge by a fine or by imprisonment”), from dis- (“apart”) + stringere (“to draw tight, strain”).

    From Wiktionary