Disjunctive meaning

dĭs-jŭngktĭv
Serving to separate or divide.
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(grammar) Serving to establish a relationship of contrast or opposition. The conjunction but in the phrase poor but comfortable is disjunctive.
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A disjunctive conjunction.
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Disjoining; separating or causing to separate.
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(logic) Designating or including a compound proposition consisting of two alternatives joined by or.
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Having to do with disjunction.
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(gram.) Indicating a contrast or an alternative between words, clauses, etc.

In “John or Bob may go, but their sister may not,” “or” and “but” are disjunctive conjunctions.

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(gram.) A disjunctive conjunction.
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(grammar, of a personal pronoun) Not used in immediate conjunction with the verb of which the pronoun is the subject. For example.

English: me, him, them.

French: moi, toi.

Irish: é, í

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Tending to disjoin; separating.
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(music) Relating to disjunct tetrachords.
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(logic) A disjunction.
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Origin of disjunctive

  • Latin disjunctivus.

    From Wiktionary