Dialysis meaning

dī-ălĭ-sĭs
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The separation of smaller molecules from larger molecules or of dissolved substances from colloidal particles in a solution by selective diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.
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Hemodialysis.
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(chem.) Any process in which the smaller dissolved molecules in a solution separate from the larger molecules by diffusing through a semipermeable membrane.
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(med.) Any of various procedures, usually performed on a regular basis on patients who have impaired kidney function, in which chemical dialysis is used to remove toxic waste, chemicals, etc. from the blood.
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The separation of smaller molecules from larger molecules or of dissolved substances from colloidal particles in a solution by selective diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.
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(medicine) Any of several techniques, especially hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, in which filtration through a semipermeable membrane is used to remove metabolic wastes and excess fluid from the blood of people with kidney failure.
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The separation of the smaller molecules in a solution from the larger molecules by passing the solution through a membrane that does not allow the large molecules to pass through.
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A medical procedure in which this technique of molecular separation is used to remove metabolic waste products or toxic substances from the blood. Dialysis is required for individuals with severe kidney failure.
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(chemistry) A method of separating molecules or particles of different sizes by differential diffusion through a semipermeable membrane.
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(medicine) Haemodialysis.
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(rhetoric) The spelling out of alternatives, or presenting of either-or arguments that lead to a conclusion.
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(rhetoric) Asyndeton.
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Origin of dialysis

  • Greek dialusis separating, dissolution from dialūein to break up, dissolve dia- apart dia– lūein to loosen leu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Dated in the late 16th Century CE; from Ancient Greek διά (diá, “inter” “through”) and λύειν (lýein, “loosen”).

    From Wiktionary