Cordon meaning

kôr'dn
A tree or shrub, especially a fruit tree such as an apple or pear, repeatedly pruned and trained to grow on a support as a single ropelike stem.
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A line of people, military posts, or ships stationed around an area to enclose or guard it.

A police cordon.

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A rope, line, tape, or similar border stretched around an area, usually by the police, indicating that access is restricted.
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A stringcourse.
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To form a cordon around (an area) so as to prevent movement in or out. Often used with off .

Troops cordoned off the riot zone.

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A line or circle of police, soldiers, forts, ships, etc. stationed around an area to guard it.
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A cord, ribbon, or braid worn as a decoration or badge.
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To encircle or shut (off) with a cordon.
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(archaic) A ribbon normally worn diagonally across the chest as a decoration or insignia of rank etc.
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A line of people or things placed around an area to enclose or protect it.
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(cricket) The arc of fielders on the off side, behind the batsman - the slips and gully.
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(botany) A woody plant, such as a fruit tree, pruned and trained to grow as a single stem on a support.
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(with "off") To form a cordon around an area in order to prevent movement in or out.
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Origin of cordon

  • French from Old French diminutive of corde cord cord
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle French cordon.
    From Wiktionary