Carnation definition

kär-nāshən
Frequency:
A flesh-colored tint formerly used in painting.
noun
2
0
A pinkish tint once used in painting.
noun
0
0
Any of numerous cultivated forms of a perennial plant (Dianthus caryophyllus) having showy, variously colored, usually double, often fragrant flowers with fringed petals.
noun
0
0
A flower of this plant.
noun
0
0
Moderate to deep red.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A popular garden and greenhouse plant (Dianthus caryophyllus) of the pink family, usually with white, pink, or red double flowers that smell like cloves.
noun
0
0
The flower of this plant.
noun
0
0
(botany) A type of Eurasian plant widely cultivated for its flowers.
  • Originally, Dianthus caryophyllus.
  • Other members of genus Dianthus and hybrids.
noun
0
0
The type of flower they bear, originally flesh-coloured, but since hybridizing found in a variety of colours.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(archaic) The pinkish colors used in art to render human face and flesh.
noun
0
0
Sometimes, a scarlet colour.
noun
0
0
Of a rosy pink or red colour.
adjective
0
0
(archaic) Of a human flesh color.
adjective
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
carnation
Plural:
carnations

Origin of carnation

  • From obsolete French flesh-colored from Old French (from Old Italian carnagione skin, complexion) (from carne flesh) or from Late Latin carnātiō carnātiōn- flesh both from Latin carō carn- sker-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French carnation (“person's color or complexion”).

    From Wiktionary