Cambium meaning

kăm'bē-əm
(botany) A layer of cells between the xylem and the phloem that is responsible for the secondary growth of roots and stems.
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A lateral meristem in vascular plants, including the vascular cambium and cork cambium, that forms parallel rows of cells resulting in secondary tissues.
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A layer of formative cells between the wood and bark in dicotyledonous plants: these cells cause the girth of the stem to increase by dividing and differentiating to form new xylem and phloem tissue, which will eventually become wood and bark.
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A cylindrical layer of tissue in the stems and roots of many seed-bearing plants, consisting of cells that divide rapidly to form new layers of tissue. Cambium is a kind of meristem and is most active in woody plants, where it lies between the bark and wood of the stem. It is usually missing from monocotyledons, such as the grasses. &diamf3; The vascular cambium forms tissues that carry water and nutrients throughout the plant. On its outer surface, the vascular cambium forms new layers of phloem, and on its inner surface, new layers of xylem. The growth of these new tissues causes the diameter of the stem to increase. &diamf3; The cork cambium creates cells that eventually become bark on the outside and cells that add to the cortex on the inside. In woody plants, the cork cambium is part of the periderm.
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Origin of cambium

  • Medieval Latin exchange from Late Latin cambīre, cambiāre to exchange of Celtic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Late Latin cambium, 'a change'
    From Wiktionary