Burgundy meaning

bûrgən-dē
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A ducal house of Burgundy split into the Capetian line (1032–1361) and the Cadet, or Valois, line (1363–1477).
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A Portuguese dynasty (1139–1383) beginning with Alfonso I, who made Portugal an independent kingdom.
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A historical region and former duchy of eastern France. The area was first organized into a kingdom by the Burgundii, a Germanic people, in the 5th century ad . At the height of its later power in the 14th and 15th centuries, Burgundy controlled vast territories in present-day Netherlands, Belgium, and northeast France. It was incorporated into the French crown lands by Louis XI in 1477.
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A dark grayish or blackish red to dark purplish red or reddish brown.
noun
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A purplish red.
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(place) Historical region in E France of varying extent.
proper name
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(place) Metropolitan region in E France: 12,194 sq mi (31,582 sq km); chief town, Dijon.
proper name
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Alternative capitalization of Burgundy (wine).
noun
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A deep red colour, like that of Burgundy wine.

noun
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Of a deep red color like that of Burgundy wine.
adjective
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A region of France.
pronoun
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A variety of red wine from this region.
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A variety of wine resembling that of Burgundy; especially from Australia or California.
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Origin of burgundy

  • Adapted from Medieval Latin Burgundia, French Bourgogne, from Late Latin Burgundiones (“highlanders”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrgh-nt- (“high, mighty”), from *bʰerǵʰ- (“high”). Cognate with Old Armenian բուրգն (burgn, “tower”), Proto-Celtic *brixs.

    From Wiktionary

  • 1881, from attributive use of Burgundy (“wine from Burgundy”) from Burgundy wine from Burgundy (“region of France”) + wine.

    From Wiktionary

  • Burgundy (wine) is an abbreviation of the attributive use of the regional name, in Burgundy wine.

    From Wiktionary