Buckram meaning

bŭkrəm
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A coarse cotton or linen fabric heavily sized with glue, used for stiffening garments and in bookbinding.
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(archaic) Rigid formality.
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Resembling or suggesting buckram, as in stiffness or formality.
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To stiffen with or as if with buckram.
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A coarse cotton or linen cloth stiffened with glue or other size, for use in bookbinding, for lining or stiffening clothes, etc.
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(archaic) Stiffness or formality.
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Of or like buckram.
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(now rare) Stiff; formal.
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To stiffen with buckram.
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A coarse cloth of linen or hemp, stiffened with size or glue, used in garments to keep them in the form intended, and for wrappers to cover merchandise.
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To stiffen with or as if with buckram.
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(botany) A plant, Allium ursinum, also called ramson, wild garlic, or bear garlic.
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Origin of buckram

  • Middle English bukeram fine linen from Old French boquerant and from Old Italian bucherame both after Bukhara (Bukhoro), from which fine linen was once imported

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bukeram (“fine linen”), from Anglo-Norman bokeram, from Old French boquerant, bougherant (“fine cloth”), bougueran, probably ultimately from Bokhara.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps from earlier buckrams, from buck +‎ ramps, ramsh (“wild garlic, ramson”). Compare Danish ramsløg (“ramson”), Swedish ramslök (“bear garlic, ramson”).

    From Wiktionary