British meaning

brĭtĭsh
Of Great Britain or its people, language, or culture.
adjective
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Of the Commonwealth.
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The language of the ancient Britons.
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noun
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With the, the citizens or inhabitants of Britain collectively.
pronoun
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With the, the citizens or inhabitants of the United Kingdom collectively.
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(history) The ancient inhabitants of the southern part of Britain before the Anglo-Saxon invasion, also called ancient Britons.
pronoun
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The Celtic language of the ancient Britons.
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The British English language.
pronoun
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Of Britain (meaning the British Isles)
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Of the United Kingdom.
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Of the Commonwealth of Nations, or the British Empire.
adjective
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(historical) Of the ancient inhabitants of the southern part of Britain; Brythonic.
adjective
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Of or relating to the ancient Britons.
adjective
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The people of Great Britain.
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British English.
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The Celtic language of the ancient Britons.
noun
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Of the ancient Britons.
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1
the British
  • The people of Great Britain.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the British

Origin of british

  • Middle English Brittish from Old English Bryttisc relating to the ancient Britons from Bryttas Britons of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • In Old English as Bryttisc (“Britons”) . The spelling with single -t- appears in the 13th century under the influence of Latin Britannia, but spelling with -tt- persists alongside -t- during the 13th to 17th centuries.

    From Wiktionary

  • In reference to the island of Great Britain from ca. 1400 (Latin natio Anglica sive Britannica, Brittisshe occean 1398, the Britishe nacion 1548). As a noun, referring to the British people, British soldiers, etc. from ca. 1600.

    From Wiktionary