Batesian-mimicry definition

bātsē-ən
A form of protective mimicry, especially in insects, in which a species that is palatable or harmless closely resembles an unpalatable or harmful species and therefore is avoided by predators.
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A kind of mimicry in which one species, to make itself less vulnerable to a particular predator, imitates the structure and coloration of another species that is unpalatable, difficult to capture, etc.
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A form of protective mimicry, especially in insects, in which a species that is palatable or harmless closely resembles an unpalatable or harmful species and therefore is avoided by predators.
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A form of protective mimicry in which an unprotected species (the mimic) closely resembles an unpalatable or harmful species (the model), and therefore is similarly avoided by predators. The close resemblance between certain harmless flies and stinging bees, and the similarity between the colored stripes of the nonpoisonous king snake and those of the highly venomous coral snake, are examples of Batesian mimicry. Batesian mimicry is named after the British naturalist Henry Walter Bates (1825–92).
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The resemblance of one or more non-poisonous species to a poisonous species, for example, the scarlet king snake and the coral snake.
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Origin of batesian-mimicry

  • After Henry Walter Bates (1825–1892), British naturalist

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Named for Henry Walter Bates

    From Wiktionary