Balsam meaning

bôlsəm
Any of various trees, especially the balsam fir, yielding an aromatic resinous substance.
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Any of various oily or gummy aromatic resins obtained from various plants and containing either benzoic or cinnamic acid.
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Any of various aromatic, resinous oils or fluids.
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Any aromatic preparation made with balsam, as certain medical dressings.
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Anything healing or soothing; balm.
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Any of various plants or trees of various families that yield balsam, as the balsam fir.
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Any of various species of the impatiens, esp. the garden balsam.
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Designating a family (Balsaminaceae, order Geraniales) of dicotyledonous plants, including jewelweed and impatiens.
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Any of various trees, especially the balsam fir, yielding an aromatic resinous substance.
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Any of several aromatic resins that flow from certain plants and that contain considerable amounts of benzoic acid, cinnamic acid, or both, or their esters. Balsams are used in perfumes and medicines.
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A sweet-smelling oil or resin derived from various plants.
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A plant or tree yielding such substance.
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(figuratively) Something soothing.

Classical music is a sweet balsam for our sorrows.

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A flowering plant of the genus Impatiens.
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A balsam fir.
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Canada balsam, a turpentine obtained from the resin of balsam fir.
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To treat or anoint with balsam.
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Origin of balsam

  • Latin balsamum from Greek balsamon of Semitic origin bśm in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English *balsam, balsme, from Old English balsam, balsamum (“balsam, balm”), from Latin balsamum, from Ancient Greek βάλσαμον (balsamon, “balsam”), of Semitic origin.

    From Wiktionary