Apocrypha meaning

ə-pŏkrə-fə
The biblical books included in the Septuagint and accepted in the Roman Catholic and Orthodox canon but considered noncanonical by Protestants because they are not part of the Hebrew Scriptures.
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Any writings, anecdotes, etc., of doubtful authenticity or authorship.
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(proper) Various writings falsely attributed to Biblical characters or kept out of the New Testament because not accepted as resulting from revelation.
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(plural only) Certain writings which are received by some Christians as an authentic part of the Holy Scriptures, but are rejected by others.

Note: Fourteen such writings, or books, formed part of the Septuagint, but not of the Hebrew canon recognized by the Jews of Palestine. The Council of Trent included all but three of these in the canon of inspired books having equal authority. The German and English Reformers grouped them in their Bibles under the title Apocrypha, as not having dogmatic authority, but being profitable for instruction. The Apocrypha is now commonly omitted from the King James Bible and most other English versions of Scripture. Note: the word is normally capitalised in this usage.

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Various early Christian writings proposed as additions to the New Testament but rejected by the major canons.
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Writings or statements of questionable authorship or authenticity.
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Fourteen books of the Septuagint that are rejected in Judaism and regarded by Protestants as not canonical: eleven of them are fully accepted in the Roman Catholic canon.
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Origin of apocrypha

  • Middle English apocripha not authentic from Late Latin Apocrypha the Apocrypha from Greek Apokrupha neuter pl. of apokruphos secret, hidden from apokruptein to hide away apo- apo- kruptein kruph- to hide

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from Latin apocryphus ("apocryphal"), from Ancient Greek ἀπόκρυφος (apocruphos, “hidden, obscure”).

    From Wiktionary