Analogy meaning

ə-nălə-jē
Frequency:
The definition of an analogy is a literal comparison between two things that have some features that are the same and others which are different.

A Model T Ford and a Volkswagen are both cars, have four wheels, and run on gasoline so comparing them would be an example of an analogy.

noun
20
6
(linguistics) The process by which words or morphemes are re-formed or created on the model of existing grammatical patterns in a language, often leading to greater regularity in paradigms, as evidenced by helped replacing holp and holpen as the past tense and past participle of help on the model of verbs such as yelp, yelped, yelped.
noun
12
3
A form of reasoning based on the assumption that if two things are known to be alike in some respects, then they are probably alike in other respects.
noun
9
4
Similarity in some respects between things otherwise unlike; partial resemblance.
noun
8
1
(biol.) Similarity in function between parts dissimilar in origin and structure, as the wing of a bird and that of an insect.
noun
6
1
Advertisement
(logic) An inference from certain admitted resemblances between two or more things to a probable further similarity between them.
noun
3
0
(biology) Correspondence in function or position between organs of dissimilar evolutionary origin or structure.
noun
3
0
The likening of one thing to another on the basis of some similarity between the two.
noun
3
1
A relationship of resemblance or equivalence between two situations, people, or objects, especially when used as a basis for explanation or extrapolation.
noun
2
0
(linguis.) The process by which words, constructions, or pronunciations conform to the pattern of other, often unrelated, ones.

“energize” is formed from “energy” by analogy with “apologize” from “apology”; Old English “handa” became “hands” on analogy with other plurals in -s.

noun
2
2
Advertisement
(biology) Correspondence in function or position between organs of dissimilar evolutionary origin or structure.
noun
1
1

Origin of analogy

  • Middle English analogie from Old French from Latin analogia from Greek analogiā from analogos proportionate analogous

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin analogia, from Ancient Greek ἀναλογία (analogia), from ἀνά (ana) + λόγος (logos, “speech, reckoning”)

    From Wiktionary