Alchemy meaning

ălkə-mē
Alchemy is defined as the process of taking something ordinary and turning it into something extraordinary, sometimes in a way that cannot be explained.

An example of using alchemy is a person who takes a pile of scrap metal and turns it into beautiful art.

When watching a movie and a wizard turns a toad into a beautiful woman, it is an example of alchemy.

noun
42
11
The definition of alchemy is a type of science and philosophy from the Middle Ages which attempted to perform successful experiments of the unusual, such as trying to make gold from metals.

An example of alchemy are the scientists of the Middle Ages who tried to discover a way to use metals such as mercury and sulfur – to make interesting combinations and attempt to turn them into gold.

An example of alchemy are the scientists of today who use lasers in order to change aluminum and other metals to black, red, or a variety of other colors.

noun
22
5
An early form of chemistry, with philosophic and magical associations, studied in the Middle Ages: its chief aims were to change base metals into gold and to discover the elixir of perpetual youth.
noun
17
4
A seemingly magical power or process of transmuting.
noun
17
5
A power or process of changing one thing into another; esp., a seemingly miraculous power or process of changing a thing into something better.
noun
11
1
Advertisement
An early, unscientific form of chemistry practiced in the Middle Ages with aims including turning base metals into gold and discovering the elixir of perpetual youth, a universal cure for disease, and a universal solvent. Many alchemists were intelligent, well-meaning men and even distinguished scientists. Sir Isaac Newton, for example, was an alchemist. Pair-gain technologies such as ADSL do not involve alchemy, although sometimes they are characterized as turning copper into gold. See also pair-gain.
5
0
(computing, slang, countable) Any elaborate transformation process or algorithm.
noun
5
1
A medieval chemical philosophy having as its asserted aims the transmutation of base metals into gold, the discovery of the panacea, and the preparation of the elixir of longevity.
noun
4
2
A medieval philosophy and early form of chemistry whose aims were the transmutation of base metals into gold, the discovery of a cure for all diseases, and the preparation of a potion that gives eternal youth. The imagined substance capable of turning other metals into gold was called the philosophers' stone.
3
3
(uncountable) The ancient search for a universal panacea, and of the philosopher's stone, that eventually developed into chemistry.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
(countable) The causing of any sort of mysterious sudden transmutation.
noun
2
0

Origin of alchemy

  • Middle English alkamie from Old French alquemie from Medieval Latin alchymia from Arabic al-kīmiyā’ al- the kīmiyā’ chemistry (from Late Greek khēmeia) (probably alteration of khumeia) (from Greek khein, khu- to pour gheu- in Indo-European roots) ((influenced, owing to the reputation of Egyptian alchemists, by Greek Khēmiā Egypt) (from Egyptian kmt Egypt) (from feminine of km black, in reference to the black soil of the Nile valley))

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French alkimie, arquemie (French alchimie), from Medieval Latin alkimia, from Arabic الكيمياء (al-kīmiyā’), ال (al, “the”) + from Ancient Greek χημεία (khēmeia) or χυμεία (chēmeia or chymeia) originally “a mingling, infusion, juice, liquid, as extracted from gold” and later “alchemy”, perhaps from Χημία (Chēmia, “black earth (ancient name for Egypt)”) and/or χυμός (chymos, “juice, sap”). (Compare Spanish alquimia and Italian alchimia).

    From Wiktionary