Aboard meaning

ə-bôrd
Alongside.

The sailboat passed our ship close aboard.

adverb
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(baseball) On base. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]

He doubled with two men aboard, scoring them both.

adverb
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Into a team, group, or company. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
adverb
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Aboard is defined as being on or inside a vehicle, ship or airplane.

An example of coming aboard would be passengers who come into the train car.

adverb
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1
On board a ship, train, aircraft, or other passenger vehicle.
adverb
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At the side; alongside.
adverb
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On board of; on; in.
preposition
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On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

We all climbed aboard.

adverb
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On or onto a horse, etc. [First attested in the late 19th century.]
adverb
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(nautical) Alongside. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

The ships came close aboard to pass messages.

adverb
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On board of; onto or into a ship, boat, train, plane. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]

We all went aboard the ship.

preposition
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In or into a group, organization, or business.

Brought aboard two new designers.

adverb
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On board; on, in, or into a ship, airplane, etc.
adverb
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As a participant, partner, employee, etc.
adverb
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On board of; on; in.
preposition
1
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Onto a horse. [First attested in the mid 20th century.]
preposition
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On base.
adverb
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all aboard!
  • Get on! get in!.
  • Everyone (is) aboard!.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of aboard

  • Middle English abord a- on a–2 bord ship (from Old English bord)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English abord, from a- (“on”) + bord (“board, side of a ship”). (Equivalent to a- +‎ board.)

    From Wiktionary