Zirconium meaning

zûr-kō'nē-əm
A lustrous, grayish-white, strong, ductile metallic element obtained primarily from zircon and used in nuclear reactors because of its high resistance to corrosion, used in ceramic and refractory compounds, and alloyed with niobium, zinc, and other metals. Atomic number 40; atomic weight 91.22; melting point 1,855°C; boiling point 4,409°C; specific gravity 6.52 (at 20°C); valence 2, 3, 4.
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A hard, ductile, gray or black, metallic chemical element found combined in zircon, etc., and used in alloys, ceramics, the cladding for nuclear fuel in reactors, etc.: symbol, Zr; at. no. 40
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A shiny, grayish-white metallic element that occurs primarily in zircon. It is used to build nuclear reactors because of its ability to withstand bombardment by neutrons even at high temperatures. Zirconium is also highly resistant to corrosion, making it a useful component of pumps, valves, and alloys. Atomic number 40; atomic weight 91.22; melting point 1,852°C; boiling point 4,377°C; specific gravity 6.56 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4.
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Zr) with an atomic number of 40.
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Origin of zirconium

  • From a New Latin coinage, from zircon.
    From Wiktionary