Would meaning

wo͝od
Frequency:
Used to express repeated or habitual action in the past.

Every morning we would walk in the garden.

verb
26
2
Would is used to indicate what could potentially happen in the future or when giving advice or when making a request.

An example of would is when you might get a good grade if you study.

An example of would is when you ask someone to pass the carrots.

An example of would is when you tell someone that your action in rain is to bring an umbrella.

verb
26
3
Used to express desire or intent.

She said she would meet us at the corner.

verb
20
1
Used to make a very polite or formal request.

Would you please open the window?

verb
17
0
Used to indicate uncertainty.

He would seem to be getting better.

verb
13
5
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(archaic) Wanted to (+ bare infinitive). [from 9th c.]
verb
5
0
Used after a statement of desire, request, or advice.

I wish you would stay.

verb
5
1
Used to express a supposition or condition.

He would write if he knew you would answer; I wouldn't do that for any amount of money.

verb
4
0
Used in the main clause of a conditional statement to express a possibility or likelihood.

If I had enough money, I would buy a car. We would have gone to the beach, had the weather been good.

verb
4
3
Used to express presumption or expectation.

That would be Steve at the door.

verb
3
1
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Used to make a polite request.

Would you go with me?

verb
3
2
If only; I wish.

Would that she were here.

verb
3
2
Used to; was or were habitually accustomed to (+ bare infinitive); indicating an action in the past that happened repeatedly or commonly. [from 9th c.]
verb
2
0
(archaic) Used with ellipsis of the infinitive verb, or postponement to a relative clause, in various senses. [from 9th c.]
verb
1
0

She said she would be finished before six, in those days we would talk for hours on end.

verb
0
1
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Was determined to; loosely, could naturally have been expected to (given the tendencies of someone's character etc.). [from 18th c.]
verb
0
1
As a modal verb, the subjunctive of will.
  • Used to give a conditional or potential "softening" to the present; might, might wish. [from 9th c.].
  • Used as the auxiliary of the simple conditional modality (with a bare infinitive); indicating an action or state that is conditional on another. [from 9th c.].
  • (chiefly archaic) Might wish (+ verb in past subjunctive); often used (with or without that) in the sense of "if only". [from 13th c.].
  • Used to impart a sense of hesitancy or uncertainty to the present; might be inclined to. Now sometimes colloquially with ironic effect. [from 15th c.].
  • Used interrogatively to express a polite request; are (you) willing to...? [from 15th c.].
    Would you pass the salt, please?.
  • (chiefly archaic) Might desire; wish (something). [from 15th c.].
verb
0
1
Used to express a wish.

Would that we had gone with you!

verb
0
2
Used with bare infinitive to form the "anterior future", indicating a futurity relative to a past time. [from 9th c.]
verb
0
2