Wight meaning

wīt
Frequency:
(archaic) A human being; person.
noun
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(place) Island in the English Channel, off the S coast of Hampshire, constituting a county of England: 147 sq mi (381 sq km)
proper name
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(archaic) A living creature, especially a human being.
noun
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(paganism) A being of one of the Nine Worlds of heathen belief, especially a nature spirit, elf or ancestor.
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(poetic) A ghost or other supernatural entity.
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(fantasy) A wraith-like creature.
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(archaic except in dialects) Brave, valorous, strong.
adjective
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(UK dialectal) Strong; stout; active.
adjective
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A living being; a creature.
noun
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1
Valorous; brave.
adjective
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(obs.) A living being; creature.
noun
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1
(now chiefly dial.) Strong, brisk, active, brave, etc.
adjective
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1

Origin of wight

  • Middle English from Old Norse vīgt neuter of vīgr able to fight weik-3 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English wiht wekti- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English wiht (“wight, person, creature, being, whit, thing, something, anything"), from Proto-Germanic *wihtiz (“essence, object"), from Proto-Indo-European *wekti- (“cause, sake, thing"), from Proto-Indo-European *wekÊ·- (“to say, tell"). Cognate with Old High German wiht (“creature, thing"), Dutch wicht, German Wicht, Swedish vätte. See also whit.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old Norse vígt, neuter of vígr (“skilled in fighting, of age"), cognate with Old English wÄ«Ä¡.

    From Wiktionary

  • The meaning of the wraith-like creature is from barrow-wights in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth world.

    From Wiktionary