Vertebra meaning

vûrtə-brə
Any of the small bones which make up the backbone.
noun
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Any of the bones or cartilaginous segments forming the spinal column.
noun
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Any of the single bones or segments of the spinal column, articulating in the higher vertebrates with those adjacent to it by means of elastic fibrous disks.
noun
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Any of the segments, composed of cartilage in cartilaginous fishes and of bone in other vertebrates, that form the spinal column.
noun
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Any of the bones that make up the vertebral column. Each vertebra contains an arched, hollow section through which the spinal cord passes. In humans, the vertebrae are divided into cervical, thoracic, and lumbar sections, and the sacrum and coccyx are both made up of a series of fused vertebrae. The vertebrae are separated by cartilaginous intervertebral disks.
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Origin of vertebra

  • Middle English from Latin from vertere to turn wer-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin vertebra (“joint"), from vertere (“to turn"). Having multiple vertebrae (plural of vertebra) in one's backbone instead of having a single bone or solid spine, allows for the movement of the body with bends and turns. Hence meaning 1.

    From Wiktionary