Verner-s-law meaning

vûr'nərz, vĕr'-
A law stating essentially that Proto-Germanic noninitial voiceless fricatives in voiced environments became voiced when the previous syllable was unstressed in Proto-Indo-European. For example, both the th- and the -d of English third are descended from Proto-Germanic voiceless *th, but the second was voiced by Verner's Law.
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An explanation for a series of apparent exceptions to Grimm's law, stating that the Proto-Germanic word-medial voiceless spirants (f, , h, s), derived from the Proto-Indo-European voiceless stops (p, t, k) and voiceless spirant (s), regularly became voiced (v, , g, z), respectively, and final (s) became (z), when the vowel immediately preceding these did not in Proto-Indo-European bear the principal accent of the word.
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(linguistics) A sound law describing the voicing of voiceless fricatives in early Proto-Germanic, due to placement of the accent on a word.
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Origin of verner-s-law

  • After Karl Adolph Verner (1846–1896), Danish philologist
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Named after Danish linguist Karl Verner (1846-1896).
    From Wiktionary