Uranus meaning

yo͝o-rānəs, yo͝orə-nəs
Uranus was discovered by Sir William Herschel a German-born astronomer from Britain on March 13, 1781. Although Uranus had been seen in the sky before this time, it was dismissed as being a star and not a planet.
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The definition of Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun in the Solar System.
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Uranus tilts on its side, and it leans so far over that its axis is level with its orbit. Uranus is tilted almost 98 degreesversus Earth's tilt of 23.5 degrees. It is believed that this severe tilt happened when a massive object struck Uranus when it was forming or soon after it formed.
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The length of one day is around 17 hours; but, if you are on one of the poles, a day would last 42 years.
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It is closer to the Sun than Neptune, but it is colder. The temperature in the atmosphere is around -355 degrees F.
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Uranus does not have a very hot core that emits infrared radiation like other large planets. It absorbs more heat than it gives off because something in the past caused its core to cool down. The core is probably rocky.
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The composition of the atmosphere is 83% hydrogen, 15% helium, 2% methane, and a small percentage of ethane and other gases. Methane absorbs red light waves, so Uranus appears bluish green with clouds of methane crystals in its atmosphere. Lower in the atmosphere are clouds of water and ammonia ice crystals.
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The rings that surround Uranus are very different because they are dark. They are also very narrow, only a few miles wide. They are made of ice and rock and it is surmised that they are very young.
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It has at least 27 moons. Some of these moons are known as "icy moons" because they have no atmosphere or magnetosphere and they have no possibility of life.
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Most of what we know of Uranus comes Voyager 2 that flew within 50,000 miles of the tops of the clouds in 1986. It took a multitude of pictures of it and its moons.

An example of Uranus is one of the four gas giants along with Jupiter, Saturn and Neptune.

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The earliest supreme god, a personification of the sky, who was the son and consort of Gaea and the father of the Cyclopes and Titans.
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The seventh planet from the sun, revolving about it every 84.01 years at a mean distance of approximately 2.9 billion kilometers (1.8 billion miles), having a mean equatorial diameter of 51,118 kilometers (31,763 miles) and a mass 14.6 times that of Earth.
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A god who is the personification of the heavens, the son and husband of Gaea (Earth) and father of the Titans, Furies, and Cyclopes: he is overthrown by his son Cronus (Saturn)
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The third largest planet of the solar system and the seventh in distance from the sun: it has a system of thin rings around the equator: diameter, c. 51,120 km (c. 31,770 mi); period of revolution, c. 84.01 earth years; period of rotation (retrograde), c. 17.24 hours around an axis tilted 98° to its orbital plane; 27 satellites; symbol, ♅
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The seventh planet from the Sun and the third largest, with a diameter about four times that of Earth. Though slightly larger than Nepture, Uranus is the least massive of the four gas giants and is the only one with no internal heat source. A cloud layer of frozen methane gives it a faint bluish-green color, and it is encircled by a thin system of 11 rings and 27 moons. Uranus's axis is tilted 98° from the vertical—the greatest such tilt in the solar system—with the result that its poles are in continuous darkness or continuous sunlight for nearly half of its 84-year orbital period.
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Before the planet was called Uranus in 1850, it was first called Georgium Sidus, or the Georgian Planet in honor of King George III of England.
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Uranus is 1,784,860,000 miles from the Sun.
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Its orbit takes 30,685 Earth days, which is a bit more than 84 years.
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Origin of uranus

  • Late Latin U̯ranus from Greek ouranos heaven, the god Uranus Sense 2, from New Latin U̯ranus since Uranus was Saturn's father just as Saturn was Jupiter's father (thus making the order of the planets' names reflect mythological genealogy)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition